Test Your Knowledge: Sepsis Quiz

Which of these statements about sepsis are true?

Correct! Wrong!

When germs get into a person’s body, they can cause an infection. If that infection isn’t stopped, it can cause sepsis. Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. It happens when an infection you already have triggers a chain reaction in your body. The infection may be in your skin, lungs, urinary tract or somewhere else. Sepsis is a life-threatening medical emergency.

True or False: Anyone can get an infection, and almost any infection can lead to sepsis.

Correct! Wrong!

Anyone can get sepsis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) risk of infection and sepsis is higher in: adults 65 or older, people with chronic or long-term health problems, such as diabetes, lung disease, cancer and kidney disease, people with weaker immune systems and children younger than one year old. Remember: Sepsis is more common and more dangerous in older adults and in those with chronic or long-term diseases.

Which of the following, alone or together, can be signs or symptoms of sepsis?

Correct! Wrong!

All of the above, alone or together, can be symptoms of sepsis. Sepsis survivors have said that they never felt so sick in their lives.

True or False: Only one in 10 patients who die in a hospital have sepsis.

Correct! Wrong!

About one in three patients who die in a hospital have sepsis. Sepsis is also a main reason why people return to the hospital. More than 1.5 million people get sepsis each year in the U.S., and at least 250,000 Americans die from sepsis each year. Severe sepsis kills more people each year than prostate cancer, breast cancer and HIV/AIDS combined. Actress Patty Duke died of sepsis.

How can you protect yourself and your family from sepsis?

Correct! Wrong!

All of the above are all ways that you can get ahead of sepsis. Help protect yourself from sepsis by getting needed vaccines, such as a flu shot and pneumonia vaccine. Healthcare providers, patients and caregivers can work as a team to prevent infections and be alert to the signs of sepsis.

Without fast treatment, sepsis can cause:

Correct! Wrong!

When sepsis is severe, tissue (like muscles) may be damaged. Some people must have surgery to remove their limbs. Organs like the lungs, kidneys and liver may fail. It is important to ACT FAST. Studies show that people with sepsis who are treated quickly are more likely to survive. Get medical care RIGHT AWAY if you suspect sepsis or have an infection that’s not getting better or is getting worse. Ask your doctor or nurse, “Could this infection be leading to sepsis?” Remember: ACT FAST. TIME MATTERS.

#StopSepsis Quiz
#StopSepsis: Getting Ready

Good job! You've taken the first steps to learn what it takes to protect yourself and your loved ones from sepsis. Feel free to take the quiz as often as you'd like to learn more and to test your knowledge. If you would like to learn more, visit this one-page resource from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that summarizes sepsis symptoms, who's at risk, and what to do if you suspect sepsis. http://bit.ly/2InvCy4
#StopSepsis: On the Move

Great work! You know what it takes to protect yourself and your loved ones from sepsis. Feel free to take the quiz as often as you'd like to learn more and to test your knowledge. Learn more about sepsis risks and how to advocate for yourself and your loved ones in this recorded presentation from Telligen and The Sepsis Alliance. http://bit.ly/2vc5BsV
#StopSepsis: Spread the Word

Wow! You are a sepsis superstar! Consider sharing your expert sepsis knowledge with your friends and family to help protect them from this devastating condition. If you would like to learn more visit this CDC resource which includes questions and answers to help start a conversation about sepsis with your healthcare provider. http://bit.ly/2V1yoz2

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This material was prepared by Telligen, the Medicare Quality Innovation Network Quality Improvement Organization, under contract with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents presented do not necessarily reflect CMS policy. This material is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice; it is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. 11SOW-IA-C3-03/25/19-3316

References:

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

National Institutes of Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Sepsis Alliance